Mystery of Fantoft - Learn Norwegian using Nynorsk
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Lessons

Velkommen

1. Hei!

2. Hallo!

3. På flyplassen

4. På Bybanen

5. Ny student

6. I Fantofthallen

7. Ein trist dag

8. Hybelen er ledig

9. Samtale med ein venn

10. På veg til Ikea

11. Ungar som leiker

12. Gåvekjøp

13. Invitasjon til fest

14. På fest

15. Per Spelmann
Lessons Text summary

16. Oppdaginga

17. Mange spørsmål

18. På Bryggen

19. Familien min

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Lesson 15 - Per Spelmann

Per Spelmann

Per Musician

Per the Musician

While the students are singing at the party, we interrupt the Mystery of Fantoft story with our own song. This is a Norwegian folk song called «Per Spelmann». There are multiple verses, but we'll only look at three of them here. If you would like to listen to the song, you can search for «Per Spelmann» on You Tube.

«Per» is a common Norwegian name.

«å spele» = «to play»
«mann» (m) = «man»

A «spelmann» is a man who plays music. Mostly used about fiddle players, but it can also be used on other kinds of music players.

Per Spelmann han hadde ei einaste ku.

Per Musician he had a single one cow

Per the Musician he had just one cow

When you sing the song, you are supposed to repeat line 1 and 2 twice. Line 3 («Du gamle, gode») is not repeated.

Han bytte bort kua, fekk fela igjen.

He traded away the cow got the fiddle again.

He traded away the cow and got his fiddle back

«ku» (f)
«fele» (f)

«Å byte» means «to trade», and in past tense it's «bytte». This verb belongs to a group of verbs called e-verbs, because they end with the letter «e» in past tense. We will study e-verbs later in the course.

Du gamle, gode fiolin, du fiolin, du fela mi.

You old good violin you violin you the fiddle of mine.

You old, good violin, you violin, you fiddle of mine.


Per Spelmann han spela, og fela var god.

Per Musician he played and the fiddle was good.

Per the Musician he played, and the fiddle was good

«Å spele» means «to play», and (here) its past tense is «spela». This verb belongs to a group of verbs called a-verbs, because they end with the letter «a» in past tense. We will study a-verbs more in the next lesson.

gutane dansa og jentene lo.

So the boys danced and the girls laughed.

So the boys were dancing and the girls were laughing.

«Danse» is also an a-verb.

Du gamle, gode fiolin, du fiolin, du fela mi.

You old good violin you violin you the fiddle of mine.

You old, good violin, you violin, you fiddle of mine.


Og om eg vert gammal som mose tre

And if I become old like moss on trees

And if I get as old as the moss on trees

«mose» (m)»
«tre» (n)

aldri eg byter bort fela for fe

so never I trade away the fiddle for cattle.

I'll never trade away my fiddle for cattle.

«fe» (n)

«byter» is present tense. Remember that verbs in present tense usually ends with the letter «r».

Du gamle, gode fiolin, du fiolin, du fela mi.

You old good violin you violin you the fiddle of mine.

You old, good violin, you violin, you fiddle of mine.

Adjectives get an «-e» ending when they are between a pronoun or definate article and a noun.
In basic form it is «ein god fiolin», but after a pronoun we get «du gode fiolin»
Also «ein gammal fiolin», but «du gamle fiolin» .
We will study adjectives more later.

å ha, har, hadde, har hatt

to have, have/has, had, have/has had

to have, has, had, has had

This is not a part of the song, of course, but just another important verb you should learn.

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